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Would ya look at that

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A shortened version of a piece I wrote on research my group conducted and my deep love of the ocean while at Coastal Studies for Girls was published in a local magazine so that was pretty exciting. http://bangordailynews.com/2014/11/26/opinion/contributors/summer-memories-microplastics-a-duty-to-protect-the-ocean-from-our-throw-away-culture/?ref=comments

A Whirl Wind

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This past week has been a whirl wind. We have been busy preparing our semester reflections which we presented today. There was an amazing array of different ways we presented our reflections. Some girls did powerpoints, or wrote a speech, or a poem, a spoken word poem, videos… The list goes on and on! It has also been a whirl wind of emotions. Excited to go home but so sad to leave. And so many lasts–solo, yoga, lunch, breakfast, sleeping all together in the bunk room–this list also goes on and on… 

Tomorrow morning is graduation. I can’t believe this is all over tomorrow.

I have to write a short post because the bunk room is also a whirl wind of commotion as we pack up! I sprained my ankle yesterday but I am going to try to be as helpful as possible. I will write more when I get home!

New York calls for ban on face scrub microbeads

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Hopefully this is just the beginning of acts like this!

Interesting Things

If you’ve ever used a face- or body-scrubbing product, it’s likely that it contained plastic microbeads. These microbeads work to slough away dead skin, but just like other plastic products they represent an environmental hazard. For this reason, efforts are being made in New York to ban this plastic pollution from products.

Microbeads are tiny spherical beads made out of polyethylene or polypropylene ranging in size from 0.004mm to 1.24mm. They can be found in products including Clearasil, Clean & Clear, L’Oreal and Neutrogena exfoliating face and body washes as well as some toothpastes. A study estimates that nearly 19 tons of microbeads are potentially discharged into the wastewater stream of the State of New York alone each year.

The problem with these microbeads is that they are just washed down the drain. Because they are so small and buoyant, many escape capture by wastewater treatment plants, which…

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